Jesus and Buddha

$26.00
978-1-62698-151-5
In stock
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2016 CATHOLIC PRESS ASSOCIATION BOOK AWARD WINNER! - SPIRITUALITY

Two friends, one a Christian theologian, the other a Buddhist-Christian theologian, explore how a conversation between Christians and Buddhists can clarify and support a spirituality that is experientially real (mystical) as well as socially engaged (prophetic). From basic questions about Buddha and Jesus—who were they? what did they teach?—Paul Knitter and Roger Haight explore Buddhist and Christian notions about ultimate reality, human nature, spiritual practice, and the question of work for peace and social transformation. They also address the nature of interreligious dialogue and the possibilities of “religious double belonging” (is it possible? dangerous? necessary?).

Paul Knitter is professor emeritus of Union Theological Seminary in New York. He is the author of numerous books, including No Other Name?; One Earth Many Religions: Multifaith Dialogue and Global Responsibility, Jesus and the Other Names: Christian Mission and Global Responsibility, and Introducing Theologies of Religions (all from Orbis). His most recent work is Without Buddha I Could Not Be a Christian (Oneworld, 2013).

Roger Haight, a Jesuit priest, is Scholar in Residence at Union Theological Seminary, New York City. A former president of the Catholic Theological Society of America, his many books include Jesus, Symbol of God, Dynamics of Theology; Christian Spirituality for Seekers; and Spirituality Seeking Theology(all from Orbis).

Book Details

Title:
Jesus and Buddha
Subtitle:
Friends in Conversation
Author:
Paul Knitter
Co-Author:
Roger Haight
Pages:
272
Binding:
softcover
File name Filesize
Jesus and Buddha Table of Contents 90 Kb
The topics are dealt with thoughtfully, with nuance, and guided by a desire to find common ground even while
acknowledging differences: Jesus and the Buddha, and their teachings, always turn out to have much more in common than differentiates them.... [The book] might serve as a fruitful introduction to theology in pluralistic seminary and college classrooms.
A welcome and stimulating invitation to explore an important relationship.
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