Environmental Science and Theology in Dialogue

$26.00
978-1-57075-912-3
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A compelling "sign of the times" is that our human experience today is defined in part by increasing ecological degradation. Given the complexity of these environmental issues, this book argues that creative and strategic collaboration between theology and environmental science is necessary to find and implement practical solutions.

The authors argue a solid grounding in environmental science creates an understanding of the major environmental problems we face: global climate change, ozone depletion, depletion of the earths resources, collapse of biodiversity, overpopulation and over-consumption, the presence of persistent toxins, and the challenges of achieving sustainability. With humankind contributing to the source of many of these problems, the book also explores the many contributions theology can make to the healing of the world?Çöincluding an understanding of God as creator and the roles of nature, grace, sin, and revelation.

With sidebars, discussion questions, and recommended readings, this book provides students and professors a text that nurtures both critical thinking and ethical action.

Russell A. Butkus is an associate professor of theology and environmental studies and associate director of the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Portland. He co-edited, with Carol Dempsey, All Creation Is Groaning: An Interdisciplinary Vision for Life in a Sacred Universe.

Steven A. Kolmes holds the Molter Chair in Science at the University of Portland. He is director of the Environmental Science Department and a professor of environmental science. He has served as a consultant for government bodies and for U.S. Catholic bishops preparing a pastoral letter on the environment.

Book Details

Title:
Environmental Science and Theology in Dialogue
Series:
Theology in Dialogue Series
Author:
Russell A. Butkus
Co-Author:
Steven A. Kolmes
Pages:
192
Binding:
Softcover
". . . a thought-provoking volume that puts eco-theology at the heart of the relationship between science and theology. . . "
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