The Christian Moral Life

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978-1-57075-881-2
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More than forty years ago the Second Vatican Council challenged Catholics to a renewal of moral theology so that the moral teachings of the church would be more focused on Christ, rooted in the scriptures, and connected to the sacramental and spiritual life. Following this recommendation, this text views the Christian moral life as one of faithful discipleship imbued with Christian virtues.

Faithful discipleship in an increasingly global world of great diversity requires that Catholics in the West dialogue on the meaning of discipleship and moral principles with other Christians, with Catholic theologians in Latin America, Africa, and Asia, and also with the other major religious traditions. With this in mind, this fresh look at Christian ethics examines the meaning of the reign of God, the virtues, sin and conversion, conscience, love, the paschal mystery, and the work of the Spirit.

Patricia Lamoureux is the co-editor of Seeking Goodness and Beauty: The Use of the Arts in Theological Ethics and the author of numerous articles on Catholic moral theology. She currently serves as adjunct faculty at Marist College, Poughkeepsie, New York.

Paul J. Wadell is professor of religious studies at St. Norbert College in De Pere, Wisconsin. He is the author of several books, including Friendship and the Moral Life, Becoming Friends, and Happiness and the Christian Moral Life.

Book Details

Title:
The Christian Moral Life
Subtitle:
Faithful Discipleship for a Global Society
Series:
Theology in Global Perspective Series
Author:
Patricia Lamoureux
Co-Author:
Paul J. Wadell
Pages:
304
Binding:
Softcover
For Wadell and Lamoureux, the moral life begins with a call to respond to the gift of other good creatures that God has made, and the Christan moral life with a call by God to be Christ's disciples. Responding well to these gifts requires learning to see, and one of the gems of the book is the authors' discussion of the need for truthful vision for moral action, which requires taking off the self-deceptive lenses we sinners would rather wear.
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