Robert Ellsberg

 

It is the rare work of theology that remains challenging and relevant fifty years after its first publication. James Cone’s Black Theology & Black Power is one of those books. Cone envisioned the 50th anniversary edition of this book, and even the introduction by Cornel West, yet sadly he did not live to see it in print. Cone wrote that this first book: “was my initial attempt to identify liberation as the heart of the Christian gospel and blackness as the primary mode of God’s presence. I wanted to speak on behalf of the voiceless black masses in the name of Jesus whose gospel I believed had been greatly distorted by the preaching and the theology of white churches.” It retains its challenge and urgency.

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